GRE Verbal Reasoning Sample Comprehension

Read the following paragraphs carefully. Choose the correct answer from the options given below:

These huge waves wreak terrific damage when they crash on the shores of distant lands or continents. Under a perfectly sunny sky and from an apparently calm sea, a wall of water may break twenty or thirty feet high over beaches and waterfronts, crushing houses and drowning unsuspecting residents and bathers in its path.

How are these waves formed? When a submarine earthquake occurs, it is likely to set up a tremendous amount of shock, disturbing the quite waters of the deep ocean. This disturbance travels to the surface and forms a huge swell in the ocean many miles across. It rolls outward in all directions, and the water lowers in the centre as another as another swell looms up. Thus a series of concentric swells are formed similar to those made when a coin or small pebble is dropped into a basin of water. The big difference is in the size. Each of the concentric rings of basin water traveling out toward the edge is only about an inch across and less than a quarter of an inch high. The swells in the ocean are sometimes nearly a mile wide and rise to several multiple of ten feet in height.

Many of us have heard about these waves, called "tsunami". Nothing was done about tsunamis until after World War II. An underwater earthquake in the Aleutian Islands could start a swell that would break along the shores and cause severe damage. These waves travel hundreds of miles an hour, and one can understand how they would crash!
  • One surprising aspect of the waves discussed in the passage is the fact that they
    • are formed in concentric patterns
    • often strike during clear weather
    • arise under conditions of cold temperature
    • are produced by deep swells
  • It is believed that the waves are caused by
    • seismic changes
    • concentric time belts
    • underwater earthquakes
    • storms
  • The normal maximum width of the waves is approximately
    • one mile
    • five miles
    • five feet
    • ten feet
  • Nothing was done about the waves until
    • deaths occurred
    • a solution was found
    • millions of dollars worth of damage was incurred
    • the outbreak of World War II
  • The movement of the waves has been measured at a speed of
    • 1 mile an hour
    • 50 miles an hour
    • 100 miles an hour
    • more than a hundred miles an hour 
    •  

Read the following paragraphs carefully. Choose the correct answer from the options given below:

These huge waves wreak terrific damage when they crash on the shores of distant lands or continents. Under a perfectly sunny sky and from an apparently calm sea, a wall of water may break twenty or thirty feet high over beaches and waterfronts, crushing houses and drowning unsuspecting residents and bathers in its path.

How are these waves formed? When a submarine earthquake occurs, it is likely to set up a tremendous amount of shock, disturbing the quite waters of the deep ocean. This disturbance travels to the surface and forms a huge swell in the ocean many miles across. It rolls outward in all directions, and the water lowers in the centre as another as another swell looms up. Thus a series of concentric swells are formed similar to those made when a coin or small pebble is dropped into a basin of water. The big difference is in the size. Each of the concentric rings of basin water traveling out toward the edge is only about an inch across and less than a quarter of an inch high. The swells in the ocean are sometimes nearly a mile wide and rise to several multiple of ten feet in height.

Many of us have heard about these waves, called "tsunami". Nothing was done about tsunamis until after World War II. An underwater earthquake in the Aleutian Islands could start a swell that would break along the shores and cause severe damage. These waves travel hundreds of miles an hour, and one can understand how they would crash!
  • One surprising aspect of the waves discussed in the passage is the fact that they
    • are formed in concentric patterns
    • often strike during clear weather
    • arise under conditions of cold temperature
    • are produced by deep swells
  • It is believed that the waves are caused by
    • seismic changes
    • concentric time belts
    • underwater earthquakes
    • storms
  • The normal maximum width of the waves is approximately
    • one mile
    • five miles
    • five feet
    • ten feet
  • Nothing was done about the waves until
    • deaths occurred
    • a solution was found
    • millions of dollars worth of damage was incurred
    • the outbreak of World War II
  • The movement of the waves has been measured at a speed of
    • 1 mile an hour
    • 50 miles an hour
    • 100 miles an hour
    • more than a hundred miles an hour

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